The Metabolic Code Triads were developed by James LaValle, RPh, CCN and Andrew Heyman, MD, MHSA. The methodology of the Triad assessment is to define important physiologic interrelationships that mediate health and disease. The purpose is to simplify complex clinical presentations and to create a common framework and language between practitioner and patient.

Five Triads comprise the organizational elements of the Metabolic Code system. Each Triad contains three interrelated biological domains where common clinical patterns often reside. By focusing on groupings of data – qualitative and quantitative – a much clearer and more powerful outline emerges of the individual’s metabolic weaknesses and strengths.

The triads piece together complex cases and simplify the process of patient care to maximize outcomes. The Metabolic Code unifies the domains of medical, functional, and wellness restraints into a powerful, successful model.

What are the Triads?

The Metabolic Code is based on 30 years of clinical research and application. It is founded on the theory of Metabolic Triads, which examines Triad physiology and pathological patterns, reviews common patient presentation within each Triad, and recommends key dietary (nutritional supplements and diet) strategies to improve health outcomes. Following is a summary of the five Triads:

Triad 1
Triad 1: Energy (Adrenal – Thyroid – Pancreas) encompasses the relationship between three important hormones: cortisol, insulin, and thyroid, which reflect the state of stress, glucose balance, and metabolism. In their most basic function, each is responsible for energy production. When Triad 1 is balanced, a person feels vital and healthy, but when unbalanced, a person feels fatigued and has a higher propensity for being overweight or obese. Read More
Triad 2
Triad 2: Resiliency (Gut – Immune – Brain) is comprised of the digestive tract, immune system, and the central nervous system. Together, these intelligent body systems make moment-to-moment decisions with regard to absorption and assimilation, and set key boundaries physically, immunologically, and mentally. When Triad 2 is normal, the person feels organized and secure within themselves and their environment, and when out of balance, this physiologic network becomes disordered and unpredictable. The key concept of Triad 2 is resiliency. An immune system that appropriately responds; absorption and utilization of nutrients; and clarity of mind are central to a balance within Triad 2. Read More
Triad 3
Triad 3: Endurance (Cardio – Pulmonary – Neuro-Vascular) includes the cardiopulmonary unit, autonomic nervous system, and the vascular tree. This Triad reflects the relationship of the mind and heart and is mediated by the respiratory cycle. When Triad 3 is in balance, the individual has plenty of metabolic resiliency and strength to meet the challenges of life. The key concept in this Triad is endurance and stamina. The delivery of oxygen and the pliability of the vascular tree along with the sense of neurologic balance are key constructs of this Triad. Read More
Triad 4
Triad 4: Detoxification (Liver – Lymph – Kidneys) contains the drainage organs of the liver, lymph, and kidneys. These organs form a functional unit for detoxification and elimination, metabolic processing and removal of toxins, and enzymatic activities. They allow us to thrive in a toxic world. When Triad 4 is in harmony, there is a smooth flow of substrates and emotions, and when out of balance, inflammation, stagnation, and retention ensues. Read More
Triad 5
Triad 5: Potency (Testosterone – Estrogen – Progesterone) includes the reproductive hormones, estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone which play a central role in the reproductive life cycle. They confer a sense of potency, power, and self-esteem for both men and women. Read More

Stacking the Triads

Additionally, there is the concept of “Triad stacking” – meaning one Triad may affect another Triad either positively or negatively. By correcting one Triad another Triad may autocorrect itself; conversely, the opposite is also true. The goal is to identify where metabolic weaknesses are most prominent and create personalized protocols to target these weaknesses through the use of nutritional supplements, diet, and exercise. This process results in measurable outcomes on the way a patient looks and feels, as well as their biochemistry and metabolism. The Metabolic Code creates a common language of health between healthcare practitioners and their patients. For the practitioners, the Metabolic Code helps to organize their thinking while creating a different grouping, so they do not end up in a maze of dietary supplements, drug therapy, or other remedies.

The Metabolic Code assesses:

  • Aging/Inflammation
  • CardioMetabolic
  • Cognitive/Mood
  • Detoxification Risk
  • Glucose Balance and Insulin Regulation
  • Immune Balance
  • Energy/Vitality
  • Intestinal Health
  • Metabolic Damage
  • Methylation

Very few patients are versed in medical terminology. The Metabolic Code helps them play an active role in their health by answering a survey that is symptom based. The survey questions are centered on:

  • Fatigue
  • Mid-day energy crash
  • Insomnia
  • Weight gain/Belly fat
  • Aches and pains
  • Foggy headed
  • Short term memory loss
  • Anxious and worried
  • Feeling overcommitted
  • Feeling emotionally flat
  • Burned out
  • Cravings

Symptoms often show up long before they create a metabolic shift in a person’s lab values. These symptoms are critical in implementing an efficacious prevention program before any changes take hold and alter a person’s chemistry in an unpredictable and undesired disease based outcome.